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Brioche loaf

 In Baked Goods, Bread, Recipes

Baking your own brioche takes a little effort but it is so worth it. Light and buttery with a pillowy interior. The leftovers are perfect for French toast.

Brioche loaf

When I first started baking bread, brioche was the one thing I found completely daunting. I feel the same way about brioche as I do about croissants. I love eating them but I don’t want to make them myself.

Brioche loaf

So you’ll understand my dismay when I was forced to make brioche for a shoot recently. I tried to find short cuts and even tweeted about it but the answer was unanimous. Brioche requires TLC. Sigh. I did however use my Kenwood to mix the dough because frankly, who has time to do it by hand? After making the dough, allowing it to rest overnight then letting it prove again, I finally got the loaves in the oven. Afterwards, I was met with the most gorgeous golden brown loaves of brioche. Bubble-topped and begging to be sliced into. As I sliced into the still-warm loaf, I was met with a burst of steam with the aroma of butter and yeast. Drool-worthy stuff, I tell you. It also became obvious to me that all the hard work was completely worth it and that I would be doing this all again. In fact, since then I’ve made this brioche another 3 times.

Brioche loaf

This recipe also makes great burger buns (simply bake them in a foil ring) and smaller brioche buns, similar to the ones you find in bakeries. The loaves remain my favourite however as they are so versatile. When sliced it makes perfect toast and if you allow it to go slightly stale, it makes the most delicious French toast I’ve ever tasted.

5.0 from 2 reviews
Brioche loaf
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Baking your own brioche takes a little effort but it is so worth it. Light and buttery with a pillowy interior. The leftovers are perfect for French toast. Allow time for the dough to rest overnight. {Allow +- 12 hours for dough to prove overnight.}
Author:
Recipe type: Bread, Brioche,
Serves: 2 loaves
Ingredients
  • 125ml warm milk
  • 3 tablespoons/70g sugar
  • 10g dried yeast
  • 4 eggs
  • 500g flour
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 175g butter, cubed (remove the butter from the fridge 30 minutes before you want to start. Butter needs to be slightly soft.)
  • 1 egg, beaten (for egg wash)
Instructions
  1. Combine the milk, sugar and yeast in the bowl of a free-standing mixer and allow to stand for 5 minutes until the mixture is creamy and start to froth slightly.
  2. Add the eggs and beat well until the eggs are well incorporated and the mixture is light and creamy.
  3. Slowly add the flour and salt with the mixer running until the flour has been incorporated.
  4. Allow to knead at medium speed for a minute.
  5. Slowly add the cubes of butter and knead for another 5 minutes.
  6. The dough will begin to pull away from the sides of the bowl and will cling to the paddle.
  7. Remove the dough and place in a buttered bowl.
  8. Cover with clingwrap and allow to rise for 2 hours.
  9. Place in the fridge and allow to stand overnight.
  10. The next day, remove the dough from the fridge and allow to come to room temperature.
  11. Divide the dough in half and place in greased loaf tins.
  12. Allow to rise for another 2 hours.
  13. Pre-heat the oven to 180°c. Brush the loaves with the egg wash.
  14. Bake the loaves for 40-45 minutes until the loaves are golden brown and sound hollow when tapped.
  15. Remove from the oven and allow to cool.

More bread recipes you will love:

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Potato, Pecorino & Rosemary bread

 

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Alida Ryder
Being a general food freak has proven to be quite helpful in this career I've found myself in. Author of two cookbooks, photographer, food stylist. Mom to twins. Ex make-up and hair artist obsessed with beautiful clothes and spaces. I love a good G&T and I've been known to spend too much money on shoes.
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Showing 66 comments
  • Drew Faber
    Reply

    Please correct the total time needed for this recipe. By my calculations, just using the time references called out in the recipe (skipping the actual time to do work,) I calculate the total time minimum to be nearly 14 hours, not “1 hour 20 mins.”

    • Alida Ryder
      Reply

      Hi Drew. I only include the time you’ll be actively busy with a recipe. I encourage readers to read the full recipe before starting so to see what equipment they need and how much time they need to allow for things like dough rising, etc. I will however add a note at the top of the recipe to allow time for the dough to prove.

  • Raufikat
    Reply

    Hi,
    I’ve had terrible luck making bread but this seemed easy enough so I tried it. First off, i ended up with a batter, not a dough. I added a bit more flour but I didn’t want it to be dry so it was extremely wet and sticky. I proved it and it seemed to have tightened up, but when I went to knead and shape it, it was still a wet mess. I proved and baked it as directed. It had a delicious taste but was VERY crumbly. What could have gone wrong? Want to try again because it tasted really good. Thanks!

    • Alida Ryder
      Reply

      The dough is meant to be very soft and sticky. It’s definitely not like any other bread dough, however it should also not be as completely wet as a pancake batter for instance. A wet/sticky dough gives you a very soft loaf which is why brioche is so light and buttery inside. The fact that yours was crumbly is very confusing to me. I actually have no idea what could’ve gone wrong there, to be completely honest. I’ll try to Google a bit to see what could’ve happened there and will get back to you.

      • Raufikat
        Reply

        I appreciate it! Thanks in advance!

  • Nas
    Reply

    Can I use this recipe for chocolate roll brioche. Does it freeze well?

    • Alida Ryder
      Reply

      I’m sure you could. To be honest, I’ve never frozen this recipe and am not sure how it will freeze due to the amount of butter? However, after a quick Google it seems you can freeze brioche dough. I would remove it from the freezer the night before you plan on baking it to give it efficient time to defrost.

  • Nas
    Reply

    Can I make chocolate filled Brioche using the same recipe and can I make a day ahead to be served for the party?

    • Alida Ryder
      Reply

      I’m sure you could! I would make the dough a day ahead but then bake it on the day you intend on serving it.

  • Marcy
    Reply

    This looks great! Two quick questions – do you is a dough hook or just the regular paddle with your mixer and how long do you leave it out to get to room temperature – 1 hour? Thanks!!

    • Alida Ryder
      Reply

      I used the dough hook and yep, around 1 hour should do the trick.

  • brinacyl
    Reply

    hi alida can I use butter flavoured crisco ( vegetable shortening) and soy milk / almond / coconut milk ? my baby can’t have dairy. also what does ” sound hollow when tapped ” means ? i know this is a stupid question, how do i tap it ? once i baked a brioche loaf, checked with a skewer inserted, which came out clean, but the loaf collapsed as the centre was not cooked (right in the middle). many thanks

    • Alida Ryder
      Reply

      You could but I’m not sure it will alter the texture of the loaf, you’ll have to experiment with it. The thing with bread is that because the dough is quite stiff, there’s nothing for the skewer to cling to so it could be raw even though the skewer comes out clean. If you upend the baked loaf and tap on the bottom, there will be a hollow sound if the bread is cooked through.

  • Liz T
    Reply

    Hello! Just stumbled on this recipe. Stupid question, but since you were using a stand mixer, did you use the standard paddle attachment or the dough hook?

    Thanks!

    • Alida Ryder
      Reply

      I used the dough hook, and not a stupid question at all!

  • Hailey
    Reply

    Do you, by any chance, have this in US measurements? I would love to give this a try!!

  • jean
    Reply

    2 teaspoon of salt… Is that correct?!?

    • Alida Ryder
      Reply

      Yep, because the dough is enriched with sugar, eggs and butter, the salt is needed to balance it all out. And remember, this makes two loaves or one very large loaf so that amount isn’t actually that much.

  • Yvonne
    Reply

    I’ve tried converting measurements to imperial. Though not exact, these are the closest I’ve come:

    125ml milk = 1/2 cup (120ml)
    10g yeast = 2 1/4 tsp (one envelope)
    500g flour = 3 1/3 cups
    175g butter = 6 oz (130g)

    I haven’t tried the recipe yet, but I will do so this week.

    • Yvonne
      Reply

      Correction: 6 oz butter is 180g

  • Chris
    Reply

    Just wondering, what are the dimensions of the loaf tins you used?

  • chloe
    Reply

    Does the dough have to stand over night in the fridge or can it be used after the rise .

    • Alida Ryder
      Reply

      The proving overnight improves the flavour of the dough tremendously but if you’re in a hurry, you can definitely use it right away. The flavour just won’t be as good as a proper brioche.

  • veeya
    Reply

    Hi Alida!

    So you used the paddle attachment on your mixer and not the dough hook right? Dying to try this recipe! Your loaf looks amazing 🙂

    • Alida Ryder
      Reply

      No, I used the dough hook. Does a much better job of kneading than the paddle would.

  • Annemay
    Reply

    Hi Alida, I’m dying to try this recipe and I’m planning on prepping the dough today. The thing is, I won’t have time to bake it tomorrow… Do you think another day + night of resting would affect the dough? Perhaps punch the dough down once or twice if it rises too much? Thanks!

    • Alida Ryder
      Reply

      Hi Annemay. So sorry for only responding to your comment now. No, I don’t think that the extra resting time will do anything to the dough. IN fact, the flavour will probably just be better!

  • Elaine
    Reply

    I’m not sure if step 6 is a good description. Watched some videos and made brioche a couple of times and the brioche batter does not come off from the sides like a traditional dough. It would resemble a thicker cake batter?

    • Alida Ryder
      Reply

      Hi Elaine, thanks for your comment. I have made this brioche a few times and when the dough has been kneaded enough, it does pull away slightly from the bowl. It could just be my dough? When I make it again I’ll make sure to check out for that and will amend the recipe if I find that it doesn’t pull away.

  • Yana
    Reply

    i read in the comments that you used bread flour but do you think all purpose flour will work as well?

    • Alida Ryder
      Reply

      Yana, all purpose flour doesn’t have as high gluten content as bread/strong flour. You need the gluten to create the texture you’re after when you’re baking bread, but especially brioche. But of course you could give it a go, it might just be slightly softer? Let me know if you do try it how the brioche turns out.

  • The Blonde Chef
    Reply

    This looks incredible! I wish I had a slice right now!

    • Alida Ryder
      Reply

      It is the most delectable treat. You must make it! 😉 x

  • Alida Ryder
    Reply

    If you’re using a Tablespoon with 15ml capacity it will be between 60g and 70g. I just re-weighed it and it came in at 66g when I used 3 tablespoons.

  • Alex
    Reply

    My bad it’d be 36g…

  • Alex
    Reply

    Um, is that 70g of sugar, or 3 tablespoons? Because 3 tablespoons would be 48grams…

  • Alida Ryder
    Reply

    Michelle I used bread flour or strong flour as I know it’s called in some places.

  • Michelle
    Reply

    Hi what flour did you use?

  • Charlene
    Reply

    Do you plait a brioche to get the shape on top.

    • Alida Ryder
      Reply

      Charlene, by placing little balls of the dough in the loaf tin it rises while it proofs and will then create that shape.

  • Sara
    Reply

    Hi what type if yeast did you use? Is dried active yeast ok to use for this recipe? Thanks

    • Alida Ryder
      Reply

      Sara, I used dried yeast and it worked perfectly.

  • Alida Ryder
    Reply

    Sheri, I don’t but you can use my conversion chart which will be way to convert this recipe.

  • Alida Ryder
    Reply

    You can use my Conversion chart to convert this recipe.

  • Sheri
    Reply

    Would you have this recipe converted to American by chance?

  • Ed
    Reply

    Do you have ingredients in imperial versus metric?

  • Alida Ryder
    Reply

    Yep, 9×5 should be perfect!

  • lina
    Reply

    do you use 9×5 loaf pans? thanks!

  • Alida Ryder
    Reply

    Absolutely not Jess. Plus you’ll get a good arm workout! 😉

  • Jess Anderson
    Reply

    This looks awesome! Except I don’t have a paddle mixer. Do you think there would be a drastic difference if I was making this by hand?

  • Flynn
    Reply

    The top looks braided. Is that how you got the knobbiness on top?

    • Alida Ryder
      Reply

      Flynn, I broke the dough into tennis ball-sized balls and placed them next to each other in the tin. This created the bubble top that you see. 🙂

      • Flynn
        Reply

        Oh cool. Thanks! I’m letting my dough warm up right now.

  • Herma
    Reply

    I made this recipe yesterday and it came out great Thanks for sharing

  • Karen @ The Food Charlatan
    Reply

    This looks aaaaaaaamazing. I don’t think any other picture today has made me crave carbs more 🙂 PS love the idea of using this dough for a burger bun. Yum.

  • Alida Ryder
    Reply

    If you do, let me know what you think. And you’re right, the inside is so soft and fluffy, it’s like a dreamy, buttery cloud!

  • Sweet and Savoury Pursuits
    Reply

    Your loaf looks beautiful! I love how the inside seems so fluffy, makes me want to give this recipe a try. Thanks!

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