My favourite Greek Salad

Greek Salad

I’m not sure if I should be proud or embarrassed at the pure simplicity of this post and indeed, of this salad. But I guess, as it is with my life, I often go from one extreme to the other. Deep fried, doughy Churros one day and a fresh and crisp Greek salad the next. And let me just clarify, I am not trying to give you a recipe for Greek salad. I’m sure you know how to chop up some salad ingredients, add chunks of Feta cheese and olives and if you are anything like me (the person who is asked to bring salads to a braai often), you have made this so many times, you could probably do it in your sleep with your arms tied back.

Greek Salad

The reason I am sharing this recipe, or actually just the way I make my Greek salad, is because I’ve been told that my salad is so good, even the men eat it before they touch their meat. I’m always surprised when I hear this as this is probably the easiest thing in the world to make. Made easier by the fact that you can make it hours before you need to serve it, dressing and all. Perhaps, that is why this salad holds so much flavour, it’s allowed to ‘marinate’ in the dressing.

Greek Salad

Which brings me to my next point. I don’t add salad leaves to my Greek salad as I’ve been told that in Greece, this is how it is done. One day (hopefully sooner, rather than later) I will have the pleasure to Greece to find out for myself, but for now, I trust my friends and family. A friend who was recently there also said that they use dried flowering Oregano (Origanum) and this is the practice with most of the dishes in the Greek cuisine. Which I’m not surprised about as I myself prefer good quality dried oregano over fresh (in most cases, that is). Something else to remember is that, because this salad is so simple, you have to use the best quality vegetables, Kalamata olives and Feta cheese you can find. Serve this salad as a side at a Braai, as part of a Meze platter or as I often do, in a big bowl for lunch with perhaps a wedge of pita bread to mop up the dressing.

I don’t include exact measurements here as it’s all up  the amount of people you are feeding.

English cucumber
ripe tomatoes, cut into large chunks
red onion, sliced as thinly as you can
kalamata olives
feta cheese, cut into chunks
dressing (for a large salad)
1/2 cup olive oil
1/2 cup lemon juice
1.5 tsp salt
1 tbsp dried oregano

  1. First, take a fork and scrape it along the length of the cucumber. (I saw Jamie Oliver doing it and just thought it is so fab) This allows the dressing to be slurped up by the cucumber.
  2. Then slice the cucumber in half length ways and remove the seeds. Slice the cucumber into thick chunks. Place into a large bowl.
  3. Add all the other salad ingredients to the bowl.
  4. Combine the dressing ingredients and mix well. Pour over the salad and allow to ‘marinate’ for at least 20 minutes but up to 2 hours.

 

 

 

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Showing 19 comments
  • marufah
    Reply

    i could go for that rite now…im on lunch and my sandwich is looking so down n dreary compared to the greek salad u have on display…will have to make greek salad tonite for supper..love the pics

  • premiumR
    Reply

    Tired of eating the normal food so need some good and delicious recipes to entertain my family.Please help!

  • Apple
    Reply

    Wow, the fetta looks nice

  • Greek Coffee
    Reply

    Hello,
    your salad looks really very nice but I would like to say something. As a 100% Greek, allow me please, to say that it is wrong to prepare this salad “hours before serving it” as you mention in your comment in Foodgawker…. Especially if you have already added salt and if you make it during Summer time… Although it might stay in the fridge, still “hours before” will make it rather soggy and watery… Up to half an hour before serving is okay, but still without any salt added. I didn’t mean to intrude but as a Greek (and a food blogger myself) I see very “weird” things around about Greek food and I feel the need to put things right so people to know how really things are. The friends who told you that in Greece we don’t put any green leaves in this salad they were absolutely right! Have a nice day and my congratulations for your blog:-))

    • Ally_R
      Reply

      Greek Coffee, I really appreciate your comment. I have to say, the leaving it to ‘marinate’ for an hour or two is not a Greek thing, that just came about one day when I was too lazy to make the salad right before us eating and then decided to make it a couple of hours ahead. Because I removed the seeds from the cucumber, it didn’t become watery at all. What happened though was that the marinate made the cucumber more crisp and the onions sweet and tangy. The tomatoes also didn’t go soggy. It’s the watery-ness in the seeds of the cucumber that will make everything soggy. I’ve made the salad this way for quite some time now and it’s a hit every time. 🙂

  • foodie @ Tasting Spot
    Reply

    i really like your food pictures and want to invite you to try out tastingspot.com. it’s for anyone that just wants another place to submit photos and share it will other foodies. It’s still in beta version, but would love for you to start adding some photos and help get it going.

  • Swee San @The Sweet Spot
    Reply

    I love eating Greek Salad, crunchy, salty refreshing and lots of different textures. I’ve yet to make one myself though.. Gonna go to the mall and get a pack of feta, a bottle of olives and make them this weekend!

  • Ali
    Reply

    I love the simplicity in making the greek salad, if the man rush to your salad before tasting the meat then you really got good hands in preparing food. I’d love to taste your cooking too… sounds delicious.

  • Priyanka
    Reply

    Wonderful post and stunning pics. Bookmarked your post m definitely gonna try it this weekend 🙂

  • PinkPOlkaDot
    Reply

    I just love greek salad and will have to make it without any leaves!! Beautiful pics!

  • Sam
    Reply

    Such stunning pics Ally and light.

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